You Don’t Have To Be In The Army To Fight In The War

YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IN THE ARMY TO FIGHT IN THE WAR

Ray Dorset 1972You Don’t Have To Be In The Army To Fight In The War, the title track from Mungo Jerry’s forthcoming album, the similarly titled You Don’t Have To Be In The Army, and the fourth maxi-single to chart at number thirteen in the UK singles chart.

Ray Dorset, as usual the singles songwriter, singer and guitar player commenting on the songs theme said, “Most of the critics failed to understand the point that I was getting at with the lyric.

“I think that they were thinking that I was referring to terrorist activities when in fact I was referring to general prejudice, and things that can happen to the everyday person such as losing your job for being late for work”.



YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IN THE ARMY TO FIGHT IN THE WAR – (Dawn)…

From out of the blue comes this new Mungo maxi-single. I say out of the blue because I had no advance knowledge of its release – it just turned up on my desk!

The odd title is really a dig at present-day society and its attitude to the long-hairs, the drop-outs and the downtrodden. But it’s treated in very carefree roundelay style, with Ray Dorset joined by the other lads in the rousing chorus.

All the usual Jerry trappings are in evidence, including kazoo, washboard, 12 string guitar, banjo and accordion. And between them, they churn out an extremely happy sound and an irresistible stomp beat.

Maybe not quite so catchy as one or two of Mungo’s earlier discs but with four tracks totalling just 14 1/2 minutes, it’s bound to prove yet another massive seller for the boys.

Music Press, 1971.

Playing 'You Don't Have To Be In The Army To Fight In The War' on Top Of The Pops - 1971
Top Of The Pops – 1971

YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IN THE ARMY TO FIGHT IN THE WAR

(Reviewer isn’t informed of the artist before listening)…

That’s Mungo Jerry. They are very heavily influenced by Memphis Jug Bands. I like it. I heard In The Summertime and thought it was a knockout.

Did they do do ‘I Hear You Knocking’? No, they didn’t. I have always liked goodtime music. It’s the happy end of the blues”.

Music Press, 1971.